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SUPERYACHT #12
Spring 2007

Article selected from our quarterly magazine dedicated to the largest and most luxurious boats with information, interviews, technical articles, images and yachting news


Summary

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Video Nautica

Article by
Franca Urbani

Photos by
Martino Motti


PHILOSOPHY
AND THE ART OF FUSION CUISINE

Philosophy

It's time to go aboard "Phylosophy". Captain Peter McMullan very kindly welcomes me on the upper deck where some pretty stewardesses are laying a table - colour scheme white and red - for lunch. My brief visit is to end in the galley so I can watch the chef preparing the food. I can't wait.

 

Philosophy

Philosophy

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Philosophy

Philosophy

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Philosophy

Philosophy

For further information: www.cnconnect.com

 
The captain supplies some technical information. "Phylosophy" is 41.50 metres long with a 7.80 metre beam and a draft of 2.25 metres. Built in 1991 she underwent refitting in 2003. Aluminium hull and teak decks. Two 1.332 HP MTU 8V396 TE84 engines give her a maximum speed of 17 knots and a cruising speed of 14.6. Range around 3500 miles. Her soaring profile and blue hull give "Phylosophy" an elegant silhouette and she attracts admiration both at sea and in harbour. The refit is highly elegant in its simplicity. Warm tones of beige and white were chosen for the interiors. The crew of 8 are at guests' disposal for the most dynamic water sports activities at sea as well as for the sweet laziness of life on board. "Everything begins in the kitchen," they say, and it's absolutely true, especially shipboard and especially on a cruise. So food too is given great attention aboard "Phylosophy". The upper deck is fantastic for dinner beneath the stars or for lighter lunches in the daytime. For undisturbed sunbathing there's the upper solarium deck, and the large bathing platform is perfect for a plunge into a clean sea.

Interior
The main saloon has a spacious relaxation area, an elegant environment and the perfect place to be prior to moving on to the dining area which, furnished with an oval table and comfortable upholstered chairs, is used for more formal meals. The atmosphere is soft and the interior is rendered welcoming by the use of tropical woods, pleasantly designed furniture and soft fitted carpeting in beige. An alternative to the saloon is the sky lounge, more informal and equipped with a plasma TV screen. In the night zone there is continuity of the colours, materials and relaxing atmosphere of the daytime zone. In fact the colours selected are once again various shades of beige and white. Even the bathrooms are tiled with a fine mosaic whose tesserae are in various shades of beige. The yacht sleeps 10, and the accommodation is as follows: two spacious VIP cabins with queen-size bed, roomy wardrobe, sofa and dressing table; two cabins with twin beds and private bathroom; and of course the owner's cabin with large double bed, a sofa on the port side and a writing desk-cum-dressing table on the starboard. The His and Hers bathrooms are completely separate, one with a shower and the other with a tub. The owner's cabin is completed by a study with desk and sofa. For water sports there are two 5.5 metre semi-rigid Stinger tenders with 90 HP Honda outboards, Seadoo GSI Jet Skis and complete scuba diving equipment.

The chef's performance
My visit ends in the galley where the captain leaves me in the hands of chef Stephen Wigley, a New Zealander. He promises to prepare no less than a three course meal, with his fusion cuisine recipes, for 10 guests due to arrive in just over an hour. First course: "Seaside scallops placed on a carrot terrine and served with avocado and lime oil"; second course: "Tempura quail with a grapefruit, ginger and peanut salad and sweet soy"; lastly the dessert: "Vanilla bean and panna cotta with a summerberry soup". The galley is long and narrow with a work surface that runs beneath the long window with a view of the Lanterna. The chef is also an expert surfer and his speed in the kitchen is amazing, almost as if he were racing against time or involved in a competitive sport. When the dishes are ready two very pretty and able stewardesses will take them up the steep stairway to the upper deck where the table is laid. So I'll see platefuls of food, set out in very complicated forms, go up the stairs, and then see the almost empty plates coming down, when almost nothing remains of that culinary art. Miracles really do take place in the galley: the space is very limited and the stairway is very steep. In my view it wouldn't take much to cause an irreparable disaster. But everything was to run smoothly. While he works the chef puts on a CD of New Zealand music, he dances, answers my questions and poses for photo shots, gleefully showing me his secret ingredient: a bottle of super-pure New Zealand avocado oil! Perplexed I ask him if he likes olive oil and, merrier than ever, he says "Yes, I love Italian food!" I feel reassured, and even more so when he lets me taste the various dishes, absolutely unusual but very, very interesting. Somewhat preoccupied I ask him if he isn't a bit behind schedule, seeing that 10 guests are about to arrive, but he calmly replies, "I have a clock in my mind". The fryer smokes, the quails are roasting and in a serial sequence, with perfect synchronism, the chef completes his 30 individual dishes, complex and perfectly decorated. A really brilliant and nice guy this Stephen Wigley!