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SUPERYACHT #12
Spring 2007

Article selected from our quarterly magazine dedicated to the largest and most luxurious boats with information, interviews, technical articles, images and yachting news


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Article by
Angelo Colombo, photos by Albert Brunstingi


VITTERS SHIPYARD MYSTÈRE

Vitters Shipyard Mystere

Mystère is a 43 metre sloop built in accordance with her owner's precise requirements. He asked the designers for high performance and a draft that would permit sailing in relatively shallow waters. The latter request in particular was in stark contrast with the need for a powerful sail plan that could also assure a good pace on a reach and in light winds.

 

Vitters Shipyard Mystere

Vitters Shipyard Mystere

Vitters Shipyard Mystere

Vitters Shipyard Mystere

Vitters Shipyard Mystere

Vitters Shipyard Mystere

Vitters Shipyard Mystere

Vitters Shipyard Mystere

Vitters Shipyard Mystere

TECHNICAL DATA
LOA: 43.20 m
Length on waterline: 38.50 m
Beam: 8.80 m
Draft: 3.50/5.75 m
Light displacement: 190.000 Kg
Ballast: 40.000 Kg
Water tanks: 5.800 litres
Fuel tanks: 12.700 litres
Hull construction material: aluminium
Superstructure construction material: carbon
Classification: Lloyd's SSC + 100 A1
Engine: 830 HP MTU 12V 183TE72.

For further information contact: Vitters Shipyard B.V., Stouweweg 33, 8064 PD Zwartslus, The Netherlands; tel. +31 (0)38 3867145; fax +31 (0)38 3868433; email info@vitters.com; website www.vitters.com.

Vitters Shipyard Mystere

 
But Vitters Shipyard took up the challenge and set out to design Mystère with the naval architects of the Bill Tripp Design studio. Further requests were for welcoming interiors that could house crew and 8 to 9 passengers also for long periods, and the whole was to be in line with top international classifications. Before talking about the interior compartmentalisation we'd like to describe the solutions adopted by Bill Tripp Design to resolve problems of a technical nature in meeting the owner's needs. Firstly, the material chosen for the hull was aluminium while carbon was preferred for the superstructures, this with view to keeping the centre of gravity as low as possible even when the drop keel is in the "short" position. Because one of the developments necessary in order to have a powerful sail plan and a reduced draft when required involved the mobile keel system which can reduce draft from 5.75 metres to 3.50. This solution permitted the development of deck gear suited to the owner's desire for a vessel that was powerful even in light wind conditions, as well as being able to approach the coast even in shoal water. Handling of the running rigging is electromechanically assisted throughout so the yacht can be sailed by a crew of six. There's also the very attractive possibility of handling the powerful sail plan from the cockpit which houses the controls for prompt intervention on all the rigging. There is no classic wheelhouse: the helmsmen's outdoor positions are aft, in a double version to facilitate control of the sail plan on all points of sailing. In place of the classic wheel there are electronic controls for both rudder and sails. Everything aboard Mystère turns out to be the result of careful study aimed at a modern design whose strong point is the combination of high performance and liveability. To optimise the latter the yard decided to locate the engine room slightly forward of the amidships zone, succeeding in creating a very spacious area which houses all the onboard systems. These can be easily inspected and are accessible from the crew's quarters forward by means of a further safety door. This solution meant that the owner's suite could be developed aft, with two double beds, saloon, dressing room and spacious bathroom, as well as another two cabins with twin beds and private bathroom. The owner's suite is accessed from the aft area of the deck which overlooks an open air lounge for his personal use. There is also access from the central corridor. An unusual solution on yachts of this kind, but even more so if we consider that this is a sloop whose performance is one of her strong points. As we said earlier, the crew's quarters are located forward where there is also a single cabin with private bathroom for an extra guest. For the crew there are two cabins in the forepeak, with bunk beds and bathrooms, the captain's cabin with double bed, plus a mess and services area. Special mention goes to the great saloon within the deckhouse. The latter is not raised very high but it gives very pleasant natural light and total visibility of the deck and the exterior. The saloon is furnished with a C-shaped sofa and central table on the port side and an L-shaped sofa with coffee table on the starboard side. The relaxation area has a sofa and table to which two further chairs can be added by turning the indoor bridge seats towards the stern. In practice the indoor bridge becomes a sharable area in leisure moments. As for the exterior, the interesting solution adopted at the stern is outstanding: the folding transom, which doubles as a bathing platform, conceals the garage for the tender, with a fully automatic system for launching and recovery. The aft gangway is also retractable into the hull, and the bathing platform is equipped with an extractable ladder in stainless steel for returning aboard after a swim out at sea. The teak deck is characterised by the clean lines of a racer, without obstacles any kind but rich in equipment in proportion to the powerful sail plan. The bridge is aft with two complete command stations from which all the running rigging can be handled simply by pressing keys. Many of the onboard accessories - such as the big electric winches - come from the Dutch firm Rondal, a sector expert that can also supply equipment ad hoc for special boats. In this case customising is particularly notable in the great drums for the sheets, located on the sides of the superstructure aft, a decidedly interesting solution. As may well be expected of Vitters, Mystère is a yacht that is sure to be talked about for the avant-garde technical solutions found everywhere aboard, as we saw for ourselves during her presentation in Amsterdam in June. The interiors, by Dick Young Design Ltd, feature a choice of modern, decisive lines that produce an essential but not minimalist style, capable of expressing elegance but without recourse to complex ornamentation. Very welcoming throughout, the interiors of Mystère highlight her owner's personal choices both in the furnishings and colours. But the work of Dick Young Design, in combination with solutions such as the aft opening of the owner's suite onto a terrace over the sea, is certainly worthy of note.