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SUPERYACHT #13
Summer 2007

Article selected from our quarterly magazine dedicated to the largest and most luxurious boats with information, interviews, technical articles, images and yachting news


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Article by
Corradino Corbò


AICON YACHTS 85 FLY

Aicon Yachts 85 Fly

The Messina shipyard continues to expand at a brisk pace and in all directions. This time with a new flagship, the result of innovative design and rigorous marketing.

 

Aicon Yachts 85 Fly

Aicon Yachts 85 Fly

Aicon Yachts 85 Fly

Aicon Yachts 85 Fly

Aicon Yachts 85 Fly

Aicon Yachts 85 Fly

Aicon Yachts 85 Fly

Aicon Yachts 85 Fly

Aicon Yachts 85 Fly

Aicon Yachts 85 Fly

TECHNICAL DATA
Design: Yard Technical Studio / Architect Marco Mannino
LOA: 26.16 m.
Beam: 6.42 m.
Draught at screws: 1.70 m.
Full load displacement: 72 t.
Passenger cabins: 4 + 2
Crew cabins: 2
Engines: Caterpillar C32 Acert 2 x 1.825 HP
Top speed: 31 knots
Cruising speed: 28 knots
Fuel tanks: 7.100 litres
Water tanks: 2.000 litres
Generators: Mase 2 x 26 Kw
CE Classification: A

For further information: Aicon S.p.A., Zona Industriale, 98040 Giammoro (Me), tel. +39 090 9385301, fax +39 090 9384145; website www.aicongroup.it; email info@aicongroup.it.

Aicon Yachts 85 Fly

 
That Aicon has an outstanding ability to make itself felt on the international market as one of the most dynamic players on the entire yachting scene is still one of the few things on which the international press - and even the yard's competitors - are in agreement. But it isn't just a matter of image, although attention to this has been the platform for the whole marketing and promotion action. In fact the powerful media machinery set in motion corresponds to the company's internal activity which is more than ever directed - especially since going public - towards design research and production. Aicon's premises today are situated in two nearby areas: Giammoro, which is dedicated to the Flybridge line, and Villafranca Tirrena for the Open line. The former also houses the management centre and the "Aicon Style Centre" which handles design, research and development. The Centre currently has several projects under way in collaboration with Italian universities for the study of and experimentation with new materials and new work process methodologies. Another philosophy that Aicon has kept faith with right from the start is follow-up, thanks to which customers benefit from prompt and unconditional service wherever they may be: an excellent system for further reinforcing the company's good name and, above all, for improving its products. One of the fruits of this exceptional entrepreneurial effervescence is the new flagship 85 Fly, the top of a range consisting of six models, four in the Flybridge series and two in the Open. Presented in preview at the Festival de la Plaisance in Cannes, where chairman Lino Siclari was awarded the Jury's Special Prize in the context of the World Yachts Trophy, and then greeted with pomp and circumstance at the last Genoa Boat Show (where among other things the hundredth example of the model 56 was celebrated), this important vessel shows the intention to occupy in a capillary manner the whole broad motoryacht segment which, setting out from 16 metres, extends to the fiscal watershed that separates the yacht and ship categories. The first significant datum concerning the 85 Fly is that she grew, coherently with the yard's philosophy, out of a design study developed entirely in-house. Which further highlights the passage of production to its most mature phase - with a tangible improvement of all general characteristics - as we already noted through the testing of the now former flagship 64 Fly. In fact though the yacht maintains the same pleasing hallmark of the models preceding her in time and in the range, there's a certain something more - not only size - that sets this vessel on a decidedly superior level. Characteristic in its originality is the overall superstructure. On a hull with a pronouncedly outstretched bow, but substantially classic, the glazing triggers a sensation of fluidity that culminates in the aft half of the fly where curved lines, projections and edges seem to delineate the tail of a comet. There are two accesses to this upper bridge: one external from the stern and the other internal, directly from the living area. Once on the flybridge you immediately appreciate the practical layout of the spaces: the helmsman's zone on the port side, flanked on the other side by an L-shaped sofa/sun-bed; the bar area with a U-shaped dinette on the port side and a well equipped counter on the starboard side; a multifunctional item with washbasin, mini-fridge and electric barbecue; and a rectangular sundeck near the Jacuzzi which, together with an extendable davit, separates the living area from the technical zone for stowing the tender. The effect of the flybridge on the overall construction is such as to surpass the main deck, but on closer inspection the latter too turns out to feature a spot-on subdivision of the external spaces: the sundeck on the forward deckhouse, the roomy gangways and above all the cockpit. Protected by the overhanging part of the flybridge and well linked with the aft platform, the cockpit is an extremely welcoming and protective environment that invites you to spend hours of relaxation - maybe at anchor - far from the sun's rays but very close to the sea. Accessed directly from the cockpit, the saloon immediately exudes that loft atmosphere which to some extent is a feature of all Aicon interiors. So unfailingly there is a clear sensation of air and light in every corner, aided by space separations that are more virtual than real. The lounge is on the immediate port side, with two sofas set in an L-shape and a table consisting of four poufs which if necessary can also be used as additional seating. Continuing forward, the dining area with a rounded table seating up to eight is separated by a partition that conceals a retractable LCD television. The starboard side of the saloon, though also well equipped, is used more than anything else as a line of communication with the other places on the same deck: the fine separate galley, laid out in a U-shape perfectly amidships on the port side, and the bridge. The bridge, with a highly technical wheelhouse on the port side and a small dinette functioning as a mess-room on the opposite side, is the heart of the crew's quarters which extend right to the forepeak on a lower level. There are two cabins (one double, one single), bathroom, small lounge and galley. A curved stairway near the saloon leads down to the cabin deck. In accordance with a now consolidated trend the owner's is in the aftermost position, where the vessel's movements are least detected and a more marked separation from the other cabins is achieved. It's very spacious and bright (four great round portholes stand out on the sides), with a large central double bed, writing corner, small lounge and a bathroom with corner tub. Forward, at the sides of the central corridor, there are two twin-bed cabins while the spacious full-beam VIP cabin, with double bed, private bathroom and shower unit, is at the bow. Throughout the night zone, as in the shared areas, the opulence of the furnishings remains rigorously within the bounds of good taste. The materials have been wisely chosen, notably teak and vegetable tanned leather, as well as several precious fabrics. As for the technical spaces, location of the engine room fully aft - fundamental to maximum exploitation of the volume available for living quarters - involved the adoption of an appropriate V-Drive transmission for the two 1.825 HP Caterpillar C32 Acert engines. With this power - a boosted version of the famous C32, the only motorisation used by the yard - the declared cruising speed is 27 knots with a top speed of 32.