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SUPERYACHT #13
Summer 2007

Article selected from our quarterly magazine dedicated to the largest and most luxurious boats with information, interviews, technical articles, images and yachting news


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Article by
Corradino Corbò

Photos by
Nicolas Claris


COUACH YACHT 3300 FLY

Couach Yacht 3300 Fly

High technology, researched design, great space given to personalisation: the new direction of the celebrated French yard has reinforced a more than century-old tradition, finding its most outstanding standard-bearer in the 3300 Fly.

 

Couach Yacht 3300 Fly

Couach Yacht 3300 Fly

Couach Yacht 3300 Fly

Couach Yacht 3300 Fly

Couach Yacht 3300 Fly

Couach Yacht 3300 Fly

Couach Yacht 3300 Fly

Couach Yacht 3300 Fly

Couach Yacht 3300 Fly

TECHNICAL DATA
Design: Guy Couach Studio
LOA 35.00 m.
Waterline length 33.00 m.
Beam: 6.80 m.
Draught: 1.70 m.
Displacement: 90 t.
Guest cabins: 4/5
Crew cabins: 3
Engines: MTU 16V2000 M93 2 x 2.400 HP
Fuel tanks: 20.000 litres
Water tanks: 2.000 litres
Design Category: A

For further information: Shipbuilder: Couach, Rue de L'Yser - 33470 Gujan-Mestras (France). Tel. 0033 5 56223550; fax 56660820. Website www.couach.com; email couach@couach.com

Couach Yacht 3300 Fly

 
With the experience handed down through four generations of shipbuilders since 1897, culminating in the new company set-up, the French yard Couach is seen today as one of the most advanced worldwide at a technological level. Experimentation with new materials, development of new procedures, research in the fields of hydrodynamics and design are the keystones of its technical department which, especially after the expansion of the early 2000's, handles a considerable interchange of experiences between the military and pleasure craft sectors. The latter - expressed in the Flying Bridge, Yacht and Open lines - covers a range that is in constant growth, urged on as it is by an equally effervescent demand. What customers are after substantially is a well balanced mix of high technology and customisation: two elements which may clash but which the Gujan- Mestras yard has miraculously showed itself capable of coupling, above all with the latest creations. This time the vessel that has attracted great interest is the 3300 Fly which, presented in preview at the Cannes Boat Show, has already found three lucky owners and therefore might be spotted in the Mediterranean this upcoming summer season. In no way unworthy of the French brand's name, this is a 33 metre cruiser in Kevlar, including the superstructure. Extremely lean, in accordance with the style that currently characterises Couach production, she might even seem a hull of offshore derivation if her considerable constitution didn't unequivocally declare that she belongs to the "ship" category. The trained eye will note plenty of analogies with the 2800 Open model - of which there already about fifteen in circulation - including the form of the hull and certain architectonic motifs; just as it is easy to imagine what the yard has drawn on for the upcoming 3000 Fly. Well, it's precisely this close generational link between the various models that shows how the principle of evolution makes even a first time vessel - as in the case of our 3300 - seem already mature and perfected, as if it were a production veteran. What contributes to this striking impression is the fact that the new Fly is already offered with four interior variants, which goes to show that Couach has its ideas clear about possible end uses: the four cabin version - with a sumptuous owner's suite amidships - for a more private use; the five cabin version, more or less similar in layout and size, for charter; the "baie ronde" version with an added circular dinette that increases seating capacity in the spacious saloon, and the "baie droite" version which is more open towards the cockpit and therefore brighter and more airy. The yard in any case is willing to carry out customisation interventions that are not merely limited to stylistic retouching. So though we can't actually talk about custom built craft we're pretty close to it. The principle that allows such flexibility is clearly visible in the deck plans where it's easy to see the modularity of certain elements which, like on a chessboard, can be moved within a well defined grid. For example, in the case of the 4 and 5 cabin versions the only sector undergoing radical modification is the central one, which accounts for around 18 percent of the longitudinal development of the hull. Which is like saying at the end of the day, appearances notwithstanding, the option possibility certainly doesn't revolutionise the overall construction process. At functional level however this 18 percent means the difference between a really grand and spacious owner's cabin - we already called it sumptuous - and a couple of comfortable double bed cabins. So with the rest remaining the same, in the 4 cabin version the "VIP" stateroom (fully forward) is promoted without any modification to the owner's in the 5 cabin configuration. And, believe me, it isn't a makeshift thing. Even less demanding, again at constructional level but certainly not insignificant at practical level, is the saloon option. The possibility of having a sheltered dining area near the entrance - which means in close contact with the cockpit - suggests a seeking of light that we might define as more "Nordic"; whereas the choice of assigning greater openness to the living area, compensated by an external dining area that exploits the semicircular sofa right at the stern, makes you think more of Mediterranean climates. To resolve any of the owner's Hamlet type doubts there is in any case the flying bridge which, quite aside from the possible choices made for the lower decks, remains an extremely welcoming and well equipped place. The outdoor command bridge on the port side leaves space for the access stairway which, linked with the side corridor of the deck below, offers a handier and more protected passage. Setting out from the helmsman's station towards the extending part aft, the space is organised in a bar area with a well equipped counter and a spacious C- shaped seating arrangement with two tables mounted on columns. Right behind them there's a perfectly circular Jacuzzi which also separates the area from the sundeck, the latter consisting of two L-shaped sofas and two well cushioned areas with ample space for six. Let's now look at another aspect of the Couach philosophy which we find unmistakeably and perfectly implemented here. We're talking about the crew's quarters, to which the French yard pays great attention, justly considering them a factor of prime importance both for the crew themselves and the guests who will certainly get better service from a satisfied crew. Well then, this yacht has a cabin with double bed and private bathroom for the captain, plus two transformable cabins (with shared bathroom) for the crew: it's all well separated from the private areas but, as is appropriate, in close proximity to the technical zones. On the subject of which we should make special mention of the garage - about 30 square metres - which is easily accessed both from the outside, by way of the fine stern bridge, and from the inside by way of the laundry room. This second possibility was designed in order to allow full exploitation of the area while under way, so maintenance could be carried out on the service boats at a time when they certainly would not be required for use. The space is such as to house a 5 metre plus tender, two jet-skis and two mopeds, as well as a compressed air tank for recharging scuba bottles and a locker for personal equipment. All this and much more on a yacht whose classy interiors and attention to detail are coupled with high performances: you zip along at a maximum speed of more than 32 knots, with the benefit of a soundproofing system that almost silences the potent pair of 2.400 HP MTUs at full power. What's more important is that at the economical cruising speed of 18 knots there's a range of more than 2.200 miles.